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LIBERTY / VICTORY SHIP FACTS

LIBERTY / VICTORY SHIP FACTS
     The initial Liberty ship design allowed a maximum speed of only 11 knots, making them easy prey for submarines, so early in 1942 designs for a 15 knot ship were begun.
     The first of 534 Victory ships, the SS United Victory, was launched on February 28 1944, and like the Liberty construction technique, used an assembly-line methodology. The next 34 Victory ships were named for each of the Allied nations; the subsequent 218 were named after American cities, the next 150 were named after educational institutions, and the rest received miscellaneous names. Attack Transports were named after Counties, except one named after President Roosevelt's personal Secretary, Marvin H. McIntyre.
     The Victory ship (officially the VC2 class) was 455 feet long and 62 feet wide. Her cross-compound steam turbine with double reduction gears developed 6,000 (AP2 type) or 8,500 (AP3 type) horsepower. One diesel Victory, the Emory Victory (VC2-M-AP4) was built. The VC2-S-AP5 was the designation given to Attack Transports built for the Navy (Haskell class). The three AP7 type were Victory's laid as AP3 or AP5 which were cancelled after VJ Day, and completed as combined passenger/cargo ships for the Caribbean trade.

VICTORY SHIP CLASS PHOTO AND DIAGRAM
Photo of SS Harvard Victory

Cross-section of VC2-S-AP3
Illustrations from Victory ships and tankers; the history of the "Victory" type cargo ships and of the tankers built in the United States of America during World War II, by L. A. Sawyer and W. H. Mitchell. Cornell Maritime Press, Cambridge, Md.,1974.

Paraglide Ship's News
Aboard the Queen Mary Monday, December 31, 1946

While this ship's newspaper is not 508-centric, it is significant for the times, many men of the 508th regiment did come home on this ship and there may have been some 508ers aboard on this sailing as well.

Read  Paraglide Ship's News  [Warning - 7 Meg file!]

Many thanks to Arthur Rottier of the Netherlands for sharing this document

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